Can I eat fruit?

Here at IQS, we love our fruit!

We know, fruit has sugar in it, but whole fresh fruit also has plenty of fibre and nutrients to help slow down the sugar dump on your liver. Our bodies are designed to metabolise the amount of sugar contained in 2-3 small pieces of fruit a day (ie around the recommended amount of sugar we should be eating per day). However, if you’re also having other sources of added sugar, that’s when you might want to reconsider your fruit intake and up your veggies instead.

We always eat fruit in its whole form and we have it as part of meal, with protein-rich cheese and nuts, or blended up with a tonne of vegetables in a green smoothie. We also try to eat fruit that’s local and in-season. 

What about juice and dried fruit?

Juices and dried fruit are sugar bombs. Dried fruit sucks all the water out, meaning the sugar is SUPER concentrated. And many varieties are then coated with added sugar to boot.

Juice brings a similar problem. Store-bought juice usually strips out most if not all of the fibrous pulp, leaving you with a mega dose of fructose likely squeezed from more fruit that you’d ever normally eat in one go. And without the fibre to slow the digestion and absorption down, that fructose will hit your liver all at once.

Note: a glass of apple juice can actually contain the same amount of sugar as a glass of Coke. Seriously.

Is fruit included on the 8-Week Program?

On the 8-Week Program, we advise cutting out fruit in weeks two to five. This is to break the sugar addiction and for your body to recalibrate, just for that short period. In week six of the 8-Week Program, we encourage everyone to reintroduce fruit and read how their bodies take to it. It's intended to be a gentle experiment to work out what's best for you.

 

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1 Comments

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    Isabelle

    Hello there. How do you calculate that a fruit is low in fructose? I've checked many sources and I'm confused. Do you only use the average fructose in a fruit or do you use ratio such as fructos versus glucose, or even the metabolic rate?

    Thanks for your answer!

    Isabelle